Look into my mirror

theuppitynegras:

yepdeesaidit:

phatbrothasblog:

2014 ESPN Body Issue, Marshawn Lynch

#moist

man lissen

(via benegesseritangel)

Anonymous said: I'm curious have you ever had a relaxer? Can you post a throw back photo of it???

anomaly1:

black--lamb:

i had a relaxer up until i was 20 lol (my mom was a beautician and straightened it when i was 5)

i cut it into a bob in highschool

image

image

then i rebelled (and wore way too much makeup):

image

then came the bowl cut in college…fml:

image

then the try to look like a sorority girl look:

image

then did this mohawk…thing to it in the summer and dyed it red (my eyebrows were also on the battlefield)

image

then i cut that shit off

image

no more relaxers

image

and in the last year….

image

image

(protective style…damn i wore that sweater a lot..)

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

(i skipped a few styles, but you get the gist) 

This post is like watching a flower bloom

theuppitynegras:

curvellas:

lacquerandcandy:

prettyboyshyflizzy:

southrnbird:

mango-emoji:

thickienicki:

my heart just dropped.

lol

Damn!!!!!!! All that man!

so wait chubby dudes winning now ? :(

Chubby dudes BEEN winning
gaht.damn.

I’M SO

he can have it all every damn day

(Source: inpaq, via benegesseritangel)

indicaxdreams:

So last night I was pretty high and thought lol ima draw a happy lil face in this banana cus why the fuck notimage

I CAME DOWNSTAIRS THIS MORNING AND NEARLY PISSED MYSELFimage

(via well-now-i-am-confused)

(Source: -lsd, via kniveschao)

blackandkillingit:

Grid Print (by Ashleigh Hutchinson)

The one thing I would tell myself is that you don’t have to be anything for anyone. And, that it’s all right to just be who you are. […] Everyone has his or her own aesthetic. And, if you’re changing yourself for every person and every situation, you can’t really find out who you are for yourself.

(via divorcedfromreality)

shedont-lye:

i lost a whole continent.  a whole continent from my memory.  unlike all the other hyphenated americans my hyphen is made of blood. feces. bone. when africa says hello my mouth is a heartbreak because i have nothing in my tongue to answer her. i do not know how to say hello to my mother.
—Nayyirah Waheed

shedont-lye:

i lost a whole continent.
a whole continent from my memory.
unlike all the other hyphenated americans
my hyphen is made of blood. feces. bone.
when africa says hello
my mouth is a heartbreak
because i have nothing in my tongue
to answer her.
i do not know how to say hello to my mother.

—Nayyirah Waheed

(via itsalltransitory-deactivated201)

2damnfeisty:

White people want in on the natural hair movement.

image

Y’all already own most of the companies selling the products, aint that enough?

(via blackgirlsparadise)

(Source: hmadr1, via kalifornia-klasss)

Blogs for black women positivity that only feature white men…

4capproved:

Blink and sparkle

imageimage

image

image

image

image

image

image

Being a Black Woman in England

msalexismarie:

Disclaimer: This is not poetic, beautiful, proofread, meant to be in a magazine or book. These thoughts are as raw as the wounds I am left with.

When I made the decision to study abroad in Manchester, England I thought I knew what I was getting into. If you have been following me for some time…

"

Black men occupy an interesting place in the popular imagination. Their superhuman sexuality is an integral part of American lore. It’s most prominently on display in the titles of pornographic videos that market the ability of big black men to ravish young, innocent white women. It’s more subtle in the white women who walk past with their eyes firmly locked on my crotch, undoubtedly pondering the question that the bold will occasionally whisper in a dark corner of a house party: “Is it true?” And the misguided among us will certainly whisper “yes” through a sly grin, unaware that entangled with the superhuman lore of the black penis is the dangerous specter of dehumanization. This strange combination of fear and fascination reveals the superhuman-subhuman duality that black men embody.

The very same superhuman virility fuels fear of black men. It’s why white women run from us in the hallways, scream when they see us jogging toward them in the street, tell us we look dangerous, and clutch their purses in elevators if they get on the elevator at all (these are actual anecdotes from me and a friend, some of which occur occasionally, others, regularly). A few decades ago, these fearful reactions would be enough to put us in danger of mob violence, regardless of how benign our presence may have been. Even now, racial hoaxes are an ever-present danger. When white people claim to have been victimized by a fictitious black man, hundreds of innocent black men are endangered as law enforcement officials search out the supposed assailant. While perceptions of hypermasculinity elevate us to the superhuman, they simultaneously reduce us to subhuman status.

"
— Robert Reece, “White Women’s Gazes, Black Men’s Bodies: Superhuman-Subhuman Duality,” Still Furious, And Still Brave:Who’s Afraid Of Persistent Blackness 1/27/13 (via racialicious)